Feb 28, 2009

Fatal Cruise of the Princeton



(Navy History) - On a late February day in 1844, a long line of black carriages drew up to the wharf at the Washington Navy Yard and dropped off the city's social elite, nearly 400 ladies and gentlemen in elegant attire and ready to celebrate. Captain Robert F. Stockton of Princeton, New Jersey, had assembled the very cream of the capital, including President John Tyler, for a demonstration cruise on board the pride of the United States Navy, the steam frigate USS Princeton . The festive voyage, however, did not go as planned. Continued

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad



(LoC) - On February 28, 1827, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad became the first U.S. railway chartered for commercial transportation of freight and passengers. Investors hoped a railroad would allow Baltimore, the second largest U.S. city at that time, to successfully compete with New York for western trade. New Yorkers were profiting from easy access to the Midwest via the Erie Canal. Continued


Photo: Harpers Ferry, MDRails

Feb 27, 2009

Weekend at War


(NYTimes) - UNIFORMED SS soldiers were the last thing Alexander Kisse ever expected to see again. Especially in a bucolic corner of southeastern Pennsylvania. But nearly six decades after fighting in Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge — and being shot in the leg while charging a pillbox encampment with a satchel of explosives — the Germans were back. Continued

Ramayana retold in "Sita Sings the Blues"


You can watch the whole movie here.

Raymond Berry


(Wikipedia) - Raymond Emmett Berry (born February 27, 1933 in Corpus Christi, Texas) was an American football wide receiver. He played for the Baltimore Colts during their two NFL championship wins. He later had a career in coaching, highlighted by his trip to Super Bowl XX as head coach of the New England Patriots. He is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Continued

Feb 26, 2009

TSA: Mule skinners need background checks, too


(CNN) - A federal anti-terror law that requires longshoremen, truckers and others to submit to criminal background checks has ensnared another class of transportation worker -- mule drivers.
Yes, so-called mule skinners -- in this case, seasonal workers who dress in colonial garb at a historical park in Easton, Pa. -- must apply for biometric Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWIC), according to the Transportation Security Administration, which says it is bound by federal law.
The requirement has officials of the Hugh Moore Historical Park perplexed. Continued

Photo: Library of Congress

1935: Elkton Gets a New Railroad Station




(WoCCP) - In the middle of the Great Depression the Pennsylvania Railroad electrified its main line between New York and Washington and this resulted in a number of improvements in Elkton. In the center of town a sharp curve in the tracks created a hazard so company engineers straightened the right-away, eliminating the dangerous bend. While they were at it they also eliminated three grade crossings and built two bridges to carry traffic safely over the busy railroad, one on North Street and the other on Bridge Street. Continued



Photos: Top: Library of Congress. Left: MDRails.

Feb 25, 2009

Barney Ewell


(Wikipedia) - Harold Norwood "Barney" Ewell (February 25, 1918 – April 4, 1996) was an American athlete, winner of one gold and two silver medals at the 1948 Summer Olympics.
Born into poverty in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Barney Ewell was one of the world's leading sprinters of the 1940s. Mr. Ewell attended John Piersol McCaskey High School in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Continued

Photo: USA Track & Field

That little house again




Fork, Maryland
Canon EOS 50D & EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS lens

Feb 24, 2009

American Brewery redevelopment


(Baltimore Grows) - ... Humanim’s connection with the American Brewery building began when a staff member scouting the area spotted “the most amazing building.” As anyone who’s seen it knows, the structure is immediately striking. A 2002 CityPaper article put it nicely: “The design has been described as everything from ‘Bavarian Gothic’ to ‘Teutonic pagoda’ to ‘circus architecture.’” Continued

Almost Gone: Another Farm






New Freedom, PA (vicinity).
Canon EOS 50D

Feb 23, 2009

A piece of Rodgers Forge history


(Baltimore Sun) - The heavy black piece of iron has spent the past few decades at Rodgers Forge Elementary School, first on display in the school library, then migrating into storage and even serving as a doorstop before the principal spirited it away to a closet for safekeeping. Now the Rodgers Forge school is offering the piece to the Maryland Historical Society, in hopes that it will once again serve as a reminder of the Towson-area neighborhood's roots. Continued

Photo: Hardfortheyard.com

Operation Drumbeat



(uboat.net) - With the japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbour on Dec 7, 1941 Hitler was bound by a promise to Japan to also declare war on the US. He did so promptly on Dec 11 and after that all restrictions on German U-boats (which had been attacked and hunted by US convoy escorts in the North Atlantic for the last 5-6 months of 1941 anyway without permission to attack the US escorts) not to attack American shipping were removed. This opened up a whole new field for Dönitz which immediately drew up plans for a devastatingly swift blow on the US eastern seaboard. Continued


Chronology of Attacks off the East Coast of the United States (Wikipedia)

  • 14 January - Panamanian tanker Norness sunk by U-123 at 40°26′24″N 70°54′29″W / 40.44°N 70.908°W / 40.44; -70.908 (Norness sunk by U-123)[2]
  • 18 January - United States tanker Allan Jackson sunk by U-66 at 35°57′N 74°20′W / 35.95°N 74.33°W / 35.95; -74.33 (23 of 35 crewmen perish)[3]
  • 18 January - United States tanker Malay damaged by U-123 at 35°25′N 75°23′W / 35.42°N 75.38°W / 35.42; -75.38 (5 crewmen perish)[3]
  • 19 January - United States steamship City of Atlanta sunk by German submarineU-123 at 35°42′N 75°21′W / 35.7°N 75.35°W / 35.7; -75.35 (43 of 46 crewmen perish)[3]
  • 19 January - Canadian steamship Lady Hawkins sunk by U-66 at 35°00′N 72°30′W / 35.0°N 72.5°W / 35.0; -72.5[3]
  • 22 January - United States freighter Norvana sunk by U-123 south of Cape Hatteras (no survivors)[4]
  • 23 January - United States collier Venore sunk by U-66 at 35°50′N 75°20′W / 35.83°N 75.33°W / 35.83; -75.33 (17 of 41 crewmen perish)[4]
  • 25 January - United States tanker Olney damaged by U-125 at 37°55′N 74°56′W / 37.92°N 74.93°W / 37.92; -74.93[4]
  • 26 January - United States freighter West Ivis sunk by U-125 (all 45 crewmen perish)[4]
  • 27 January - United States tanker Francis E. Powell sunk by U-130 at 37°45′N 74°53′W / 37.75°N 74.88°W / 37.75; -74.88 (4 of 32 crewmen perish)[5]
  • 27 January - United States tanker Halo damaged by U-130 at 35°33′N 75°20′W / 35.55°N 75.33°W / 35.55; -75.33[5]
  • 30 January - United States tanker Rochester sunk by U-106 at 37°10′N 73°58′W / 37.17°N 73.97°W / 37.17; -73.97 (3 of 32 crewmen perish)[5]
  • 31 January - British tanker San Arcadio sunk by U-107 at 38°10′N 63°50′W / 38.17°N 63.83°W / 38.17; -63.83[5]
  • 31 January - British tanker Tacoma Star sunk by U-109 at 37°33′N 69°21′W / 37.55°N 69.35°W / 37.55; -69.35[5]
  • 2 February - United States tanker W.L.Steed sunk by U-103 at 38°25′N 72°43′W / 38.42°N 72.72°W / 38.42; -72.72 (34 of 38 crewmen perish)[6]
  • 3 February - Panamanian freighter San Gil sunk by U-103 at 38°05′N 74°40′W / 38.08°N 74.67°W / 38.08; -74.67 (2 of 40 crewmen perish)[6]
  • 4 February - United States tanker India Arrow sunk by U-103 at 38°48′N 73°40′W / 38.8°N 73.67°W / 38.8; -73.67 (26 of 38 crewmen perish)[6]
  • 5 February - United States tanker China Arrow sunk by U-103 at 38°44′N 73°18′W / 38.73°N 73.30°W / 38.73; -73.30[6]
  • 6 February - United States freighter Major Wheeler sunk by U-107 (all 35 crewmen perish)[7]
  • 8 February - British freighter Ocean Venture sunk by U-108 at 37°05′N 74°45′W / 37.08°N 74.75°W / 37.08; -74.75[7]
  • 10 February - Canadian tanker Victolite sunk by U-564 at 36°12′N 67°14′W / 36.2°N 67.23°W / 36.2; -67.23[7]
  • 15 February - Brazilian steamship Buarque sunk by U-432 at 36°35′N 75°20′W / 36.58°N 75.33°W / 36.58; -75.33[8]
  • 18 February - Brazilian tanker Olinda sunk by U-432 at 37°30′N 75°00′W / 37.5°N 75.0°W / 37.5; -75.0[9]
  • 19 February - United States tanker Pan Massachusetts sunk by U-128 at 28°27′N 80°08′W / 28.45°N 80.13°W / 28.45; -80.13 (20 of 38 crewmen perish)[9]
  • 20 February - United States freighter Azalea City sunk by U-432 at 38°00′N 73°00′W / 38.0°N 73.0°W / 38.0; -73.0 (All of 38 crewmen perish)[10]
  • 21 February - United States tanker Republic sunk by U-504 at 27°05′N 80°15′W / 27.08°N 80.25°W / 27.08; -80.25 (5 of 29 crewmen perish)[10]
  • 22 February - United States tanker Cities Service Empire sunk by U-128 at 28°00′N 80°16′W / 28.0°N 80.27°W / 28.0; -80.27 (14 of 50 crewmen perish)[10]
  • 22 February - United States tanker W.D.Anderson sunk by U-504 at 27°09′N 79°56′W / 27.15°N 79.93°W / 27.15; -79.93 (35 of 36 crewmen perish)[10]
  • 26 February - United States bulk carrier Marore sunk by U-432 at 35°33′N 74°58′W / 35.55°N 74.97°W / 35.55; -74.97[11]
  • 26 February - United States tanker R.P.Resor sunk by U-578 at 39°47′N 73°26′W / 39.78°N 73.43°W / 39.78; -73.43 (47 of 49 crewmen perish)[11]
  • 28 February - United States destroyer Jacob Jones sunk by U-578 at 38°42′N 74°39′W / 38.70°N 74.65°W / 38.70; -74.65[11]
  • 7 March - United States freighter Barbara sunk by U-126 at 20°00′N 73°56′W / 20.00°N 73.93°W / 20.00; -73.93[12]
  • 7 March - United States freighter Cardonia sunk by U-126 at 19°53′N 73°27′W / 19.88°N 73.45°W / 19.88; -73.45[12]
  • 7 March - Brazilian steamship Arbabutan sunk by U-155 at 35°15′N 73°55′W / 35.25°N 73.92°W / 35.25; -73.92[12]
  • 9 March - Brazilian steamship Cayru sunk by U-94 at 39°10′N 72°02′W / 39.16°N 72.03°W / 39.16; -72.03[12]
  • 10 March - United States tanker Gulftrade sunk by U-588 at 39°50′N 73°52′W / 39.84°N 73.87°W / 39.84; -73.87[13]
  • 11 March - United States freighter Texan sunk by U-126 at 21°32′N 76°24′W / 21.53°N 76.4°W / 21.53; -76.4[13]
  • 11 March - United States freighter Caribsea sunk by U-158 at 34°40′N 76°10′W / 34.67°N 76.16°W / 34.67; -76.16[13]
  • 12 March - United States tanker John D. Gill sunk by U-158 at 35°55′N 77°39′W / 35.92°N 77.65°W / 35.92; -77.65 (4 crewmen perish)[13]
  • 12 March - United States freighter Olga sunk by U-126 at 23°39′N 77°00′W / 23.65°N 77.0°W / 23.65; -77.0[13]
  • 12 March - United States freighter Colabee damaged by U-126 at 22°14′N 77°35′W / 22.23°N 77.58°W / 22.23; -77.58[13]
  • 13 March - United States schooner Albert F. Paul sunk by U-332 at 26°00′N 72°00′W / 26.0°N 72.0°W / 26.0; -72.0 (no survivors)[13]
  • 13 March - Chilean freighter Tolten sunk by U-404 at 40°10′N 73°50′W / 40.16°N 73.84°W / 40.16; -73.84 (15 of 16 crewmen perish)[13]
  • 14 March - United States collier Lemuel Burrows sunk by U-404 at 39°12′N 74°16′W / 39.20°N 74.27°W / 39.20; -74.27[13]
  • 15 March - United States tanker Ario sunk by U-158 at 34°20′N 76°39′W / 34.33°N 76.65°W / 34.33; -76.65 (7 of 36 crewmen perish)[13]
  • 15 March - United States tanker Olean sunk by U-158 at 34°24′N 76°29′W / 34.40°N 76.48°W / 34.40; -76.48[13]
  • 16 March - United States tanker Australia sunk by U-332 at 35°07′N 75°22′W / 35.12°N 75.37°W / 35.12; -75.37[13]
  • 16 March - British tanker San Demetrio sunk by U-404 at 37°03′N 73°50′W / 37.05°N 73.84°W / 37.05; -73.84[14]
  • 17 March - United States tanker Acme damaged by U-124 at 35°06′N 76°40′W / 35.1°N 76.67°W / 35.1; -76.67[14]
  • 17 March - Greek freighter Kassandra Louloudi sunk by U-124 four mile off Diamond Shoals gas buoy[14]
  • 17 March - Honduran freighter Ceiba sunk by U-124 at 35°43′N 73°49′W / 35.72°N 73.82°W / 35.72; -73.82[14]
  • 18 March - United States tanker E.M.Clark sunk by U-124 at 34°50′N 75°35′W / 34.84°N 75.58°W / 34.84; -75.58[14]
  • 18 March - United States tanker Papoose sunk by U-124 at 34°17′N 76°39′W / 34.28°N 76.65°W / 34.28; -76.65[14]
  • 18 March - United States tanker W.E.Hutton sunk by U-332 at 34°05′N 76°40′W / 34.08°N 76.67°W / 34.08; -76.67 (13 of 36 crewmen perish)[14]
  • 19 March - United States freighter Liberator sunk by U-332 at 35°05′N 75°30′W / 35.08°N 75.50°W / 35.08; -75.50 (5 crewmen perish)[14]
  • 20 March - United States tanker Oakmar sunk by U-71 at 36°21′N 68°50′W / 36.35°N 68.84°W / 36.35; -68.84 (6 of 36 crewmen perish)[14]
  • 21 March - United States tanker Esso Nashville sunk by U-124 at 33°35′N 77°22′W / 33.58°N 77.37°W / 33.58; -77.37[14]
  • 21 March - United States tanker Atlantic Sun damaged by U-124[14]
  • 22 March - United States tanker Naeco sunk by U-124 at 33°59′N 76°40′W / 33.98°N 76.67°W / 33.98; -76.67 (24 of 39 crewmen perish)[14]
  • 25 March - Dutch tanker Ocana sunk by U-552 at 42°36′N 64°25′W / 42.6°N 64.42°W / 42.6; -64.42[14]
  • 26 March - United States Q-ship USS Atik sunk by U-123 at 36°00′N 70°00′W / 36.0°N 70.0°W / 36.0; -70.0 (All of 139 crewmen perish)[15]
  • 26 March - United States tanker Dixie Arrow sunk by U-71 at 34°59′N 75°33′W / 34.98°N 75.55°W / 34.98; -75.55 (11 of 33 crewmen perish)[15]
  • 26 March - Panamanian tanker Equipoise sunk by U-160 at 36°36′N 74°45′W / 36.6°N 74.75°W / 36.6; -74.75[15]
  • 29 March - United States steamship City of New York sunk by U-160 at 35°16′N 74°25′W / 35.27°N 74.42°W / 35.27; -74.42 (24 of 157 crewmen perish)[15]
  • 31 March - United States tug Menominee and barges Allegheny and Barnegat sunk by U-754 at 37°34′N 75°25′W / 37.57°N 75.42°W / 37.57; -75.42[15]
  • 31 March - United States tanker Tiger sunk by U-754 (1 of 43 crewmen perishes)[16]
  • 3 April - United States freighter Otho sunk by U-754 at 36°25′N 71°57′W / 36.42°N 71.95°W / 36.42; -71.95 (31 of 53 crewmen perish)[16]
  • 4 April - United States tanker Byron D. Benson sunk by U-552 at 36°08′N 75°32′W / 36.13°N 75.53°W / 36.13; -75.53 (9 of 37 crewmen perish)[16]
  • 6 April - United States tanker Bidwell damaged by U-160 34°25′N 75°57′W / 34.42°N 75.95°W / 34.42; -75.95 (1 of 33 crewmen perishes)[17]
  • 7 April - Norwegian freighter Lancing sunk by U-552 off Cape Hatteras[17]
  • 7 April - British tanker British Splendour sunk by U-552 off Cape Hatteras[17]
  • 8 April - United States tanker Oklahoma damaged by U-123 at 31°18′N 80°59′W / 31.3°N 80.98°W / 31.3; -80.98 (19 of 37 crewmen perish)[17]
  • 8 April - United States tanker Esso Baton Rouge damaged by U-123 at 31°13′N 80°05′W / 31.22°N 80.08°W / 31.22; -80.08 (3 of 39 crewmen perish)[17]
  • 9 April - United States freighter Esparta sunk by U-123 30°46′N 81°11′W / 30.77°N 81.18°W / 30.77; -81.18 (1 of 40 crewmen perishes)[18]
  • 9 April - United States freighter Malchace sunk by U-160 at 34°28′N 75°56′W / 34.47°N 75.93°W / 34.47; -75.93 (1 of 29 crewmen perishes)[18]
  • 9 April - United States tanker Atlas sunk by U-552 at 34°27′N 76°16′W / 34.45°N 76.27°W / 34.45; -76.27 (2 of 34 crewmen perish)[18]
  • 9 April - tanker Tamaulipas sunk by U-552 at 34°25′N 76°00′W / 34.42°N 76.0°W / 34.42; -76.0 (2 of 37 crewmen perish)[18]
  • 10 April - United States tanker Gulfamerica sunk by U-123 at 30°14′N 81°18′W / 30.23°N 81.3°W / 30.23; -81.3 (19 of 48 crewmen perish)[18]
  • 11 April - United States tanker Harry F. Sinclair Jr. damaged by U-203 at 34°25′N 76°30′W / 34.42°N 76.5°W / 34.42; -76.5 (10 of 36 crewmen perish)[18]
  • 11 April - British steamship Ulysses sunk by U-160 at 34°23′N 75°35′W / 34.38°N 75.58°W / 34.38; -75.58[18]
  • 12 April - Panamanian tanker Stanvac Melbourne sunk by U-203 at 33°53′N 77°29′W / 33.88°N 77.48°W / 33.88; -77.48[18]
  • 12 April - United States freighter Leslie sunk by U-123 at 28°37′N 80°25′W / 28.62°N 80.42°W / 28.62; -80.42 (3 of 32 crewmen perish)[18]
  • 14 April - British freighter Empire Thrush sunk by U-203 at 35°12′N 75°14′W / 35.2°N 75.23°W / 35.2; -75.23[19]
  • 14 April - United States freighter Margaret sunk by U-571 at 35°12′N 75°14′W / 35.2°N 75.23°W / 35.2; -75.23 (All of 29 crewmen perish)[19]
  • 15 April - United States freighter Robin Hood sunk by U-575 at 38°39′N 66°38′W / 38.65°N 66.63°W / 38.65; -66.63 (14 of 38 crewmen perish)[19]
  • 16 April - United States freighter Alcoa Guide sunk by U-123 at 35°34′N 70°08′W / 35.57°N 70.13°W / 35.57; -70.13 (6 of 34 crewmen perish)[19]
  • 17 April - Argentine tanker Victoria damaged by U-201 at 36°41′N 68°48′W / 36.68°N 68.8°W / 36.68; -68.8[19]
  • 18 April - United States tanker Axtell J. Byles damaged by U-136 at 35°32′N 75°19′W / 35.53°N 75.32°W / 35.53; -75.32[20]
  • 19 April - United States freighter Steel Maker sunk by U-136 at 33°05′N 70°36′W / 33.08°N 70.6°W / 33.08; -70.6 (1 of 45 crewmen perishes)[20]
  • 20 April - United States freighter West Imboden sunk by U-752 at 41°14′N 65°54′W / 41.23°N 65.9°W / 41.23; -65.9[20]
  • 21 April - United States freighter Pipestone County sunk by U-576 at 37°35′N 66°20′W / 37.58°N 66.33°W / 37.58; -66.33[20]
  • 21 April - United States freighter San Jacinto sunk by U-201 at 31°10′N 70°45′W / 31.16°N 70.75°W / 31.16; -70.75 (14 of 183 crewmen perish)[20]
  • 29 April - United States tanker Mobiloil sunk by U-108 at 26°10′N 66°15′W / 26.16°N 66.25°W / 26.16; -66.25[21]
  • 29 April - United States tanker Federal sunk by U-507 at 21°13′N 76°05′W / 21.22°N 76.08°W / 21.22; -76.08 (5 of 33 crewmen perish)[21]
  • 2 May - United States armed yacht Cythera sunk by U-402 off North Carolina (66 of 68 crewmen perish)[20]
  • 4 May - United States tanker Norlindo sunk by U-507 at 24°57′N 84°00′W / 24.95°N 84.0°W / 24.95; -84.0 (5 of 28 crewmen perish)[22]
  • 4 May - United States tanker Munger T. Ball sunk by U-507 at 25°17′N 83°57′W / 25.28°N 83.95°W / 25.28; -83.95 (30 of 34 crewmen perish)[22]
  • 4 May - United States tanker Joseph M. Cudahy sunk by U-507 at 25°57′N 83°57′W / 25.95°N 83.95°W / 25.95; -83.95 (27 of 37 crewmen perish)[22]
  • 4 May - United States freighter Delisle damaged by U-564 at 27°02′N 80°03′W / 27.03°N 80.05°W / 27.03; -80.05 (2 of 36 crewmen perish)[22]
  • 5 May - United States freighter Afoundria sunk by U-108 at 20°00′N 73°30′W / 20.0°N 73.5°W / 20.0; -73.5[22]
  • 5 May - United States tanker Java Arrow damaged by U-333 at 27°30′N 80°08′W / 27.5°N 80.13°W / 27.5; -80.13 (2 of 47 crewmen perish)[22]
  • 6 May - United States tanker Halsey sunk by U-333 at 27°14′N 80°03′W / 27.23°N 80.05°W / 27.23; -80.05 (5 of 28 crewmen perish)[23]
  • 6 May - United States freighter Alcoa Puritan sunk by U-507 at 28°40′N 88°22′W / 28.67°N 88.37°W / 28.67; -88.37[23]
  • 8 May - United States freighter Ohioan sunk by U-564 at 26°31′N 79°58′W / 26.52°N 79.97°W / 26.52; -79.97 (15 of 37 crewmen perish)[24]
  • 10 May - United States tanker Aurora damaged by U-506 at 28°35′N 90°00′W / 28.58°N 90.0°W / 28.58; -90.0 (1 of 50 crewmen perishes)[25]
  • 12 May - United States tanker Virginia sunk by U-507 at 28°53′N 89°29′W / 28.88°N 89.48°W / 28.88; -89.48 (27 of 41 crewmen perish)[25]
  • 13 May - United States tanker Gulfprince damaged by U-507 at 28°32′N 91°00′W / 28.53°N 91.0°W / 28.53; -91.0[25]
  • 13 May - United States tanker Gulfpenn sunk by U-506 at 28°29′N 89°12′W / 28.48°N 89.2°W / 28.48; -89.2 (13 of 38 crewmen perish)[25]
  • 13 May - United States freighter David McKelvy sunk by U-506 at 28°30′N 89°55′W / 28.5°N 89.92°W / 28.5; -89.92 (17 of 36 crewmen perish)[25]
  • 15 May - United States freighter Nicarao sunk by U-751 at 25°20′N 74°19′W / 25.33°N 74.32°W / 25.33; -74.32 (8 of 39 crewmen perish)[26]
  • 16 May - United States tanker Sun damaged by U-506 at 28°41′N 90°19′W / 28.68°N 90.32°W / 28.68; -90.32[26]
  • 16 May - United States tanker William C. McTarnahan damaged by U-506 at 28°52′N 90°20′W / 28.87°N 90.33°W / 28.87; -90.33 (18 of 38 crewmen perish)[26]
  • 16 May - United States tanker Gulfoil sunk by U-506 at 28°41′N 90°19′W / 28.68°N 90.32°W / 28.68; -90.32 (21 of 40 crewmen perish)[26]
  • 19 May - United States freighter Heredia sunk by U-506 at 27°32′N 91°00′W / 27.53°N 91.0°W / 27.53; -91.0 (36 of 62 crewmen perish)[27]
  • 19 May - United States freighter Ogontz sunk by U-103 at 23°30′N 86°37′W / 23.5°N 86.62°W / 23.5; -86.62 (19 of 41 crewmen perish)[27]
  • 20 May - United States tanker Halo sunk by U-506 at 28°42′N 90°08′W / 28.7°N 90.13°W / 28.7; -90.13 (21 of 42 crewmen perish)[27]
  • 20 May - United States freighter George Calvert sunk by U-752 at 22°55′N 84°26′W / 22.92°N 84.43°W / 22.92; -84.43 (3 of 61 crewmen perish)[27]
  • 21 May - United States freighter Plow City sunk by U-588 at 39°08′N 69°57′W / 39.13°N 69.95°W / 39.13; -69.95 (1 of 30 crewmen perishes)[28]
  • 26 May - United States tanker Carrabulle sunk by U-106 at 26°09′N 89°21′W / 26.15°N 89.35°W / 26.15; -89.35 (22 of 40 crewmen perish)[29]
  • 26 May - United States freighter Atenas damaged by U-106 at 25°50′N 89°05′W / 25.84°N 89.08°W / 25.84; -89.08[29]
  • 30 May - United States freighter Alcoa Shipper sunk by U-404 at 37°49′N 65°15′W / 37.82°N 65.25°W / 37.82; -65.25 (7 of 32 crewmen perish)[30]
  • 1 June - United States freighter West Notus sunk by U-404 at 34°10′N 68°20′W / 34.16°N 68.33°W / 34.16; -68.33 (4 of 40 crewmen perish)[30]
  • 1 June - United States freighter Hampton Roads sunk by U-106 at 23°00′N 85°42′W / 23.0°N 85.7°W / 23.0; -85.7 (5 of 28 crewmen perish)[31]
  • 3 June - United States freighter M.F. Elliott sunk by U-502 off the Florida Keys (13 of 45 crewmen perish)[31]
  • 10 June - United States tanker Hagan sunk by U-157 at 22°00′N 77°30′W / 22.0°N 77.5°W / 22.0; -77.5 (6 of 44 crewmen perish)[32]
  • 12 June - United States tanker Cities Service Toledo sunk by U-158 at 29°02′N 91°59′W / 29.03°N 91.98°W / 29.03; -91.98 (15 of 45 crewmen perish)